Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Sign in to follow this  
the.geremy

Please Explain

Recommended Posts

Hi, I start to play ETS2 and I need little help. Can someone explain this functions and how to use them. 

 

- Engine Break

- Engine Break Toggle

- Engine Break Increase

- Engine Break Decrease

- Trailer Break

- Retarder Increase

- Retarder Decrease

- Lift/Drop Axle

- Lift/Drop Trailer Axle

 

Some of them I know a little what they mean, but when to use them in the game...

 

Thanks

 

 

aaa.png

Edited by the.geremy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, the.geremy said:

Hi, I start to play ETS2 and I need little help. Can someone explain this functions and how to use them. 

 

- Engine Break

- Engine Break Toggle

- Engine Break Increase

- Engine Break Decrease

- Trailer Break

- Retarder Increase

- Retarder Decrease

- Lift/Drop Axle

- Lift/Drop Trailer Axle

 

Some of them I know a little what they mean, but when to use them in the game...

 

Thanks

 

 

aaa.png

Engine break is when the exhaust gases are used to slow the engine when the foot is lifted from the accelerator peddle slowing you down faster, the rest should be obvious from this.

 

Trailer break, when you break the trailer also applies breaking reducing the chance of jack knifing. 

 

Retarder works much the same way i believe.

 

You lift axels when you not carrying a load and on a truck its also used for additional traction,

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonko :) One more question, what is retarder? 😄 and If you play this game, can you recommend any mod? Thanks a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Retarders are just another braking system that uses the engine against its self. Pro mods make a great map mod otherwise I steer clear of mods to many can mess your game up, so always make a backup of your profile if using modes otherwise you might lose everything and have to start all over again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

uff, thanks for info and advice

I also find this:

(for those who are interested in) 

 

retarder is a device used to augment or replace some of the functions of primary friction-based braking systems, usually on heavy vehicles. Retarders serve to slow vehicles, or maintain a steady speed while traveling down a hill, and help prevent the vehicle from "running away" by accelerating down the hill. They are not usually capable of bringing vehicles to a standstill, as their effectiveness diminishes as vehicle speed lowers. They are usually used as an additional "assistance" to slow vehicles, with the final braking done by a conventional friction braking system. As the friction brake will be used less, particularly at higher speeds, their service life is increased, and since in those vehicles the brakes are air-actuated helps to conserve air pressure too.

Friction-based braking systems are susceptible to "brake fade" when used extensively for continuous periods, which can be dangerous if braking performance drops below what is required to stop the vehicle – for instance if a truck or bus is descending a long decline. For this reason, such heavy vehicles are frequently fitted with a supplementary system that is not friction-based.

Retarders are not restricted to road motor vehicles, but may also be used in railway systems. The Britishprototype Advanced Passenger Train (APT) used hydraulic retarders to allow the high-speed train to stop in the same distance as standard lower speed trains, as a pure friction-based system was not viable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

Terms of Use, Privacy Policy, Guidelines, We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.